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SCIENCE SAYS: HOW SEASONAL TIME CHANGES CAN AFFECT HEALTH

UNDATED (AP) _ With the seasonal end of daylight saving time fast approaching, many scientists say it’s time for a permanent ban because of potential ill effects to human health.

Losing an hour of daylight sounds depressing, and at least one study found an increase in people seeking help for depression after turning the clocks back to standard time in November. That was in Scandinavia. But research says the springtime start of daylight saving time may be even more harmful. Springing forward has been linked with more car accidents, heart attacks in vulnerable people and other health problems.

Daylight saving time runs from the second Sunday in March to the first Sunday in November. This year, that means turning your clocks back an hour at 2 a.m. local time this Sunday.

MEASLES SAPS KIDS’ ABILITY TO FIGHT OTHER GERMS

WASHINGTON (AP) — New research shows yet another reason to vaccinate children against measles. After a bout of measles, youngsters are more vulnerable to other germs such as flu or strep.

It turns out the measles virus erases much of the immune system’s memory of prior infections, hampering its ability to quickly react if those germs return. Scientists dubbed the startling findings “immune amnesia.”

Harvard researchers tested blood samples of unvaccinated Dutch children that were taken before and after a measles outbreak. After recovering from measles, the kids’ previous immunity to other germs plummeted. British researchers supported the findings, concluding measles essentially returns the immune system to a baby-like state.

There’s some evidence it could take years to rebuild those defenses.

The research was published Thursday in the journals Science and Science Immunology.

MEXICO MARKS DAY OF DEAD ON 500TH ANNIVERSARY OF CONQUEST

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico is marking its Day of the Dead amid the 500th anniversary of the Spanish Conquest, and true to the holiday’s roots, it has become an opportunity for reflection and reconciliation, not revenge.

Often misinterpreted as Mexico’s equivalent of Halloween, the two-day Nov. 1-2 Day of the Dead is a celebration to welcome and commune with the dead, not fear their return or revive old hatreds.

This year it comes very close to 500 years after a bloody date: the Oct. 18, 1519 massacre of thousands of indigenous people at the ceremonial center of Cholula, just east of Mexico City.

The Cholula killings were perhaps the first large-scale indigenous massacre, the beginning of a series of mass killings in the Americas that would continue up to the early 1900s.

OFFICIALS: MASS OKLAHOMA INMATE RELEASE IS NATION’S LARGEST

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — More than 400 Oklahoma inmates are expected to walk out of prison on Monday in what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in the nation’s history.

The Oklahoma Pardon and Parole Board is expected to approve the commutations on Friday and forward them to Gov. Kevin Stitt for his signature. Oklahoma voters approved a state question in 2016 that made simple drug possession and low-level property crimes misdemeanors instead of felonies. A bill approved earlier this year and signed by Stitt applied those sentences retroactively.

The agency’s executive director Steve Bickley says the mass release is the most on one day since former President Barack Obama commuted the drug sentences of 330 federal prisoners on his last day in office.

NOTRE DAME DELAYS PLAN TO COVER COLUMBUS MURALS UNTIL 2022

SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) — The University of Notre Dame is delaying its plan to cover up 19th century murals depicting Christopher Columbus in America that have long been criticized for their stereotypical images of Native Americans and blacks.

The Catholic university based in South Bend, Indiana, announced in January that it would conceal the offending artwork. The school’s president, the Rev. John I. Jenkins, said last month that a new exhibit will explore Notre Dame’s early history, including images of the Columbus murals and information about their historical importance.

A school spokesman said this week that Notre Dame won’t cover the 1880s paintings until the museum is completed in 2022.

Students, employees and alumni signed a letter in a 2017 campus newspaper calling for the murals to be removed.

INDIANA WOMAN FOUND DEAD WITH 8-FOOT PYTHON AROUND HER NECK

OXFORD, Ind. (AP) — Police say a woman has been found dead with an 8-foot-long python wrapped around her neck at a snake-laden home in northern Indiana.

Indiana State Police says 36-year-old Laura Hurst of Battle Ground, Indiana, was found unresponsive Wednesday night on the floor of a home in Oxford, with the snake wrapped loosely around her neck.

Police says the person who found the woman removed the reticulated python from her neck, but medics were unable to revive her. The woman’s cause of death remains under investigation, with an autopsy scheduled Friday.

Police say about 140 snakes were found in the home about 20 miles northwest of Lafayette. The woman apparently owned about 20 of them and had visited the home about twice a week.

Associated Press

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