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POLICE SEEK TO ID SUSPECT IN FATAL STABBING

OXON HILL, Md. (AP) — Authorities are trying to identify a suspect they say fatally stabbed a customer who cut in line for a chicken sandwich at a Popeyes in Maryland.

Prince George’s County Police Chief told reporters Tuesday that the detectives believe 28-year-old Kevin Tyrell Davis of Oxon Hill was systematically cutting in line for 15 minutes before another customer confronted him and an argument spilled outside the restaurant.

Investigators believe Davis was fatally stabbed once Monday night.

Police are circulating surveillance video of the unidentified suspect and of a woman who apparently was with him and are asking for the public’s help in identifying him.

Popeyes resumed selling its chicken sandwich Sunday. It was first released in August, and the chain credited popular demand to its supply selling out that month.

ABC SAYS INTERVIEW WITH EPSTEIN ACCUSER WASN’T READY TO AIR

NEW YORK (AP) — ABC News is defending itself against charges that it was afraid to air an interview with a Jeffrey Epstein accuser after video emerged Tuesday showing its reporter, Amy Robach, venting about her story.

Questions about whether the news organization was reluctant to air a sensitive story about alleged sexual impropriety were raised after a conservative web site, Project Veritas, released “hot mic” video of Robach complaining her bosses quashed the story. Robach was in a Times Square studio but wasn’t on air at the time.

The accuser, Virginia Roberts, claims Epstein forced her as a teenager into sex with prominent men, including Prince Andrew. Andrew and Epstein, before he died in August, denied the charges. Roberts has gone public with her claims.

ABC says that Robach’s 2015 interview with Roberts didn’t have enough corroborating evidence.

Project Veritas says it received the video from an “ABC insider” it didn’t identify.

US HEALTH OFFICIALS LINK CHILDHOOD TRAUMA TO ADULT ILLNESS

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials say millions of cases of heart disease and other illnesses are linked to physical and psychological harm suffered early in life.

In a report released Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looked at child abuse, divorce and other potentially traumatic events that happen to kids.

The study echoes earlier research that found links between harmful childhood experiences and health problems as adults. Researchers also tried to estimate the impact.

The officials acknowledged the study does not prove one causes the other. And they were not able to rule out other possible factors, like the stress of family financial problems.

SUNSHINE STATE CONSIDERS BANNING SUNSCREEN BANS

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida tourist haven Key West wants to protect coral reefs that attract divers, so it’s banning sunscreens that contain chemicals that could harm them.

But Florida lawmakers who think it’s more important to protect humans are moving toward outlawing the Key West’s sunscreen ban and making sure no other local governments impose similar ordinances.

The battle pits local governments against state government and environmentalists against dermatologists in an argument about coral bleaching and skin cancer.

A bill sponsored by Sen. Rob Bradley has been approved in two committees and has one more stop before reaching the full state Senate. An identical House bill will make the first of three committee stops Wednesday.

The sale of sunscreens containing oxybenzone or octinoxate in Key West will be illegal starting in 2021.

JUSTICES STRUGGLE WITH COPYRIGHT CASE INVOLVING PIRATE SHIP

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is wrestling with a modern-day dispute involving the pirate Blackbeard’s ship that went down off North Carolina’s coast more than 300 years ago.

The justices on Tuesday heard arguments in a copyright case over photos and videos that document the recovery of the Queen Anne’s Revenge, discovered in 1996.

The company that took the images holds the copyrights to them and says the state should pay for using them. North Carolina says a federal law that seems to allow for copyright infringement lawsuits against states is unconstitutional.

It was unclear what the justices would decide.

AGENCY: ALL STATES SHOULD REQUIRE BICYCLISTS TO WEAR HELMETS

DETROIT (AP) — A government agency is recommending that all 50 states enact laws requiring bicyclists to wear helmets to stem an increase in bicycle deaths on U.S. roadways.

The recommendation was among several issued by the National Transportation Safety Board after a hearing Tuesday on bicycle safety. The agency says 857 bicyclists died in crashes with motor vehicles in the U.S. last year, a 6.3% increase over 2017. Bicycle deaths rose even though total road deaths fell 2.4%.

The NTSB also found that improved road designs to separate bicycle and vehicle traffic, and making bicyclists more visible through clothing, lights and technology would reduce the number of cyclist deaths.

NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt says if changes aren’t made, more bicyclists will die.

Associated Press

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